Molecular Weight and Structural Properties of Biodegradable PLA Synthesized with Different Catalysts by Direct Melt Polycondensation

Authors

  • Hyung Woo Lee Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Industrial Technology Institute of Technology Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung, 40132
  • Rizki Insyani Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Industrial Technology Institute of Technology Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung, 40132
  • Daniel Prasetyo Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Industrial Technology Institute of Technology Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung, 40132
  • Hermawan Prajitno Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Industrial Technology Institute of Technology Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung, 40132
  • Johnner P. Sitompul Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Industrial Technology Institute of Technology Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung, 40132

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.5614/j.eng.technol.sci.2015.47.4.2

Abstract

Production of biodegradable polylactic acid (PLA) from biomassbased lactic acid is widely studied for substituting petro-based plastics or polymers. This study investigated PLA production from commercial lactic acid in a batch reactor by applying a direct melt polycondensation method with two kinds of catalyst, γ-aluminium(III) oxide (γ-Al2O3) or zinc oxide (ZnO), in reduced pressure. The molecular weight of the synthesized PLA was determined by capillary viscometry and its structural properties were analyzed by functional group analysis using FT-IR. The yields of polymer production with respect to the theoretical conversion were 47% for γ-Al2O3 and 35% for ZnO. However, the PLA from ZnO had a higher molecular weight (150,600 g/mol) than that from γ-Al2O3 (81,400 g/mol). The IR spectra of the synthesized PLA from both catalysts using polycondensation show the same behavior of absorption peaks at wave numbers from 4,500 cm-1 to 500 cm-1, whereas the PLA produced by two other polymerization methods "? polycondensation and ring opening polymerization "?showed a significant difference in % transmittance intensity pattern as well as peak area absorption at a wave number of 3,500 cm-1 as "?OH vibration peak and at 1,750 cm-1 as "?C=O carbonyl vibrational peak.

References

Gruber, P.R., Hall, E.S., Kolstad, J.J., Iwen, M.L., Benson, R.D. & Borchardt, R.L., US Patent 6,326,458, 2001.

DegBe, P., Dubois, P. & Jerome, R., Macromol. Symp., 123, pp. 67-84, 1997.

Miyoshi, R., Hashimoto, N., Koyanagi, K., Sumihiro, Y. & Sakai, T., Int Polym Process. XI, 4, pp. 320-328, 1996.

Schwach, G., Coudane, J., Engel, R. & Vert, M., Journal of Polymer Science: Part A: Polymer Chemistry, 35, pp. 3431-3440, 1997.

DegBe, P., Dubois, P, Jerome R., Jacobsen S. & Fritz H.G., Macromol. Symp. 144, pp. 289-302, 1999.

Ryner M., Stridsberg K. & Albertsson A. C., Macromolecules, 34, pp. 3877-3881, 2001.

Odile, D.C., Blanca, M.V. & Didier, B., Chem. Rev., 104, pp. 6147-6176, 2004.

Ajioka, M., Enomoto, K., Suruki, K. & Yamaguchi, A., Bull. Chem. Soc.Jpn, 68, pp. 2125, 1995.

Otera, J., Kawada, K. & Yano, T., Chem Lett, 225, 1996.

Moon, S.I., Lee, C.W., Miyamoto, T.M. & Kimura, Y., Macromol.Biosci., 3, pp. 301, 2003.

Chen, G.X., Kim, H.S., Kim, E.S. & Yoon, J.S., European Polymer Journal, 42, pp. 468-472, 2006.

Sung, I.M., Chan, W.L., Miyamoto, M. & Kimura Y., J. Polym. Sci.: Part A: Polym. Chem., 38(9), pp. 1673-1679, 2000.

Gao, Q., Lan, W., Shao, H.L. & Hu, X.C., Polym. J., 34(11), pp. 786-793, 2002.

Kawaambwa, H.M., Goodwin, J.W., Hughes, R.W. & Reynolds, P.A., Colloids and Surfaces, A: Physicochem. Eng. Aspects, 294, pp. 14-19, 2007.

Garlotta, D., J. Polym. Environ., 9, pp. 63-84, 2001.

Kister, G., Cassanas, G. & Vert, M., Polymer, 39, pp. 267-273, 1998.

Younes, H. & Cohn, D., European Polymer Journal, 24(8), pp. 765-773, 1988.

Kinugasa, S., Tanabe, K. & Tamura, T., AIST: RIO-DB Spectral Database for Organic Compounds, SDBS, http://sdbs.db.aist.go.jp/

sdbs/cgi-bin/direct_frame_disp.cgi?sdbsno=12682 (14 May 2013).

Downloads

Published

2015-09-30

Issue

Section

Articles